Lowdown: We were surrounded

On a hot, sunny evening in the valley we sat on smelly folding lawn chairs we should have replaced years ago but I didn’t know until just then that they were smelly, as if they’d been stored in a dark, dank basement for years. Now I know.

To the east loomed a flat-top mountain, reaching five-thousand-plus feet above us. Sheer cliffs to the south and west obscured another horizon but promised to hide the sun in just a little while. To the north and stretching toward Utah, more cliffs hid the high desert that reached beyond to wherever.

Strangers and friends arrived with their own smelly chairs and straw hats and camera phones and smiles, and attitudes and opinions on their tees and skins, and expectations of reliving something of the past that just would not fade away. An hour on, maybe more, it happened in this place by the river where we sat surrounded by the world and now by sound.

Boz Scaggs was at Las Colonias Park, Grand Junction, Colorado.

It’s not really over, but I’m sorry you missed it.

Alter egos are us

We (my alter ego and I) thought we would give this share a Twitter link thing a try here on the blog and let y’all know we’re there.

We might even let WordPress automatically tweet this blog post about Twitter to both of our Twitter feeds at the same time and see what happens. Yeah, let’s go with that.

Write on.

B.J.

It’s the guns

One mass murder after another, and so-called leaders spout the same old crap and pitiful excuses for their continuing failure to prevent gun violence.

Anything short of banning the civilian ownership or use of weapons of war will be the result of cowardice, another failure to protect children and all of the rest of us.

Call your U.S. senators and representatives and demand the ban.

If you think this infringes on your right to bear arms, get back to me with proof of your current membership in a well-regulated militia (WRM). I hear a WRM is necessary to the security of a free State. Unregulated gun ownership is not.

Sign of a sick society, addicted to guns and violence

Writing, blocks and deadlines

I caught part of an interesting discussion on The Content Wrangler the other day about technical writer’s block. As something of a writer’s block skeptic, I was reminded (again) about the importance of defining terms.

A highlight for me in Overcoming Technical Writer’s Block was host Scott Abel’s perspective on having to meet deadlines when he worked as a journalist. As another guy whose writing career started at a daily newspaper, I could relate. Writer’s block? A reporter who can’t meet deadlines probably isn’t a reporter for very long. I think the same applies to other writers who need to finish assignments on time.

Another type of block. Image by Foundry Co from Pixabay

I’ve read various takes on writer’s block and accept it is a real thing in people’s lives, but it can mean quite different things in different circumstances. Much depends on how you define the words you use. Take what you mean by writing and deadline, for example. Here’s what those terms mean here at The Smith Compound:

Writing – A process for creating prose, poetry or another collection of words for any purpose. It is not an act. The writing process begins with an idea. In the news business, it often begins with an assignment to be finished by a deadline. Gathering information is part of the writing process. Figuring out how to tell a story is part of the process, too, whether the writer is hiking in the forest or fishing or riding a bicycle. Sitting in front of a computer screen or other device to put words in a certain order is part of the process. Doing any of those things while struggling to come up with an idea of what to write may indicate the existence of writer’s block.

Deadline – An unmovable target for completion of a project, writing or otherwise. If the target date can be changed, it might be a goal – or a suggestion, or maybe wishful thinking – but it isn’t a deadline. There are consequences for missing deadlines.

Write on, my friends.

B.J.