Yes, make things worse to discourage driving

Image by pixaoppa from Pixabay

The Denver Post said in a Sunday morning editorial it is “thrilled” the city remains committed to improving and adding to safer infrastructure for cyclists.

It spent the next several paragraphs with cautions, “questioning the wisdom” of plans for such improvements on Broadway, and saying the city shouldn’t be “spineless in this matter.” Then it wound up being spineless:

In short, we support the addition of bicycle lanes. Just don’t make things worse.

The Denver Post, January 26, 2020

That doesn’t sound like it came from an editorial board that is thrilled. Indeed, it is more akin to committed to the status quo. God forbid that anyone be inconvenienced by making the roads safer and encouraging more people to leave their cars at home.

Only a week ago, the same newspaper reported on how denizens of the Denver area are driving more when they should be driving less and on the unacceptable pollution of Colorado’s air.

The dangerous pollution that we breathe in every day inconveniences all of us while contributing to increasingly deadly changes in our atmosphere.

This is no time for weasel words and half-hearted measures that signal no real commitment to improving our lives. It is time to make people uncomfortable enough – to inconvenience them enough – to change their driving behavior.

Again, ask yourself why you drive and see if you can find another way to get around.

Pedal on.

B.J.

Vultures circling, Denver Post calls for its own sale

Anyone who understands the importance of a strong, free press will be disturbed about the precarious state of journalism in Colorado.

So dire is the situation that the Denver Post today called out its owner, a New York City hedge fund, for yet another round of cutbacks. It called on Alden Global Capital to sell the newspaper to an owner that is “willing to do good journalism.”

The Denver Post has done good journalism for decades but is being starved of the resources it needs to continue. These are challenging times for most news organizations, yet many, including The Post, can and do remain viable if that’s what ownership wants.

The Post’s ability to fulfill its important role in the community has been diminished by round after round of greed-induced reductions in newsroom personnel. The latest cuts will further damage its ability to keep us informed.

I could go on, but read the newspaper’s own call for action and act accordingly:

As vultures circle, The Denver Post must be saved

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