Dangerous thoughts on a Boulder trail

bike-197229The tall, slender man rolled fast toward me
on his bicycle, talking to the purple-haired
woman riding next to him, looking at his phone,
unaware of his likely imminent demise.

I had the body mass index advantage, I said
later. I had a helmet. I was going downhill
as he was going up. He was shirtless and the
road rash would be ugly if he even survived.

My bicycle was new, nearly scratch-free. I had
things to do, a looming deadline, bills to pay.
I shouted, too politely, and spared his life,
as I had with the oblivious guy the other day.

The next time he may not hear me and we’ll collide
but I swear in advance that I tried to avoid him
even though I was tempted to teach him a lesson.
I really don’t have time to waste in prison.

 

Vultures circling, Denver Post calls for its own sale

Anyone who understands the importance of a strong, free press will be disturbed about the precarious state of journalism in Colorado.

So dire is the situation that the Denver Post today called out its owner, a New York City hedge fund, for yet another round of cutbacks. It called on Alden Global Capital to sell the newspaper to an owner that is “willing to do good journalism.”

The Denver Post has done good journalism for decades but is being starved of the resources it needs to continue. These are challenging times for most news organizations, yet many, including The Post, can and do remain viable if that’s what ownership wants.

The Post’s ability to fulfill its important role in the community has been diminished by round after round of greed-induced reductions in newsroom personnel. The latest cuts will further damage its ability to keep us informed.

I could go on, but read the newspaper’s own call for action and act accordingly:

As vultures circle, The Denver Post must be saved

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I shot the piper

Out for a sunny Sunday morning bicycle ride, in search of good coffee and wildlife, I heard the reedy chant of the elusive Boulder County piper as I rolled into the little town of Lyons. I stopped at the corner, looked to my right, my left, ahead and behind, but could not find the source before it fell silent.

Thinking to press on to the Stone Cup and hoping to spot the wily creature on the way back home, I clicked into a pedal and pushed off only to stop again as the mournful drone and melody came right back to life.

Up. I looked up, and there it was.

God help me, I shot it. I bagged my first piper.

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Critters, critters everywhere

A theme of sorts appeared out of nowhere in the past week and a day or so.

I happened upon a mule deer, two if you count the one that’s mostly hidden…

Rabbit Mountain mule deer

…went with friends to watch the elk and listen to them bugle…

Rocky Mountain elk

…and spotted this critter hunting on a hillside near where I work my day job.

Hunter on Table Mesa

Makes a guy wonder what’s next.

Boulder Sheriff, welcome to civil disobedience

You will have to forgive me for nearly laughing out loud (I mean, LOL) when I read of Boulder County Sheriff Joe Pelle’s concern regarding a protest tonight that involved blocking traffic on U.S. Highway 36.

The story says Pelle thinks it’s a “no win” situation for police because either the public will be upset if law enforcers do nothing or the protesters and their supporters will be upset if someone uses tear gas or force or something and “we will be scrutinized.”

Isn’t scrutiny of law enforcement precisely the point, FCOL?

Sheriff Pelle seems to not have been paying attention. More from the article:

“The thing is, I’m not sure, exactly, what they are trying to accomplish,” Pelle said.

Now I understand. Our sheriff hasn’t a clue. He needs to get one.

Welcome to Civil Disobedience 101, Sheriff Pelle. Pay attention now, as upsetting as it may be…

via U.S. 36 shut down as protesters march down 28th toward Baseline – Boulder Daily Camera.